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The review of the citations in the book had been going well – until today.

I took a short vacation to attend my niece’s wedding in Indiana.

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Of course when in Indiana I had to take a side trip to the genealogical library in Fort Wayne. Didn’t have time to do any research, but my sister and I did check out family history books to see what we liked.

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Allen County Genealogical Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana

Back home and back to work.

Colbert section – done

Whelan section – done

Section III – almost done – one more day should do it.

Opened up the document and:

>Ms Word has stopped working

I spent all day trying to find a solution. The only change I had made since last using Ms Word was to download the software that came with my new Epson scanner.

Uninstalled it – no change.

I let Windows upload all those updates I had been avoiding – no change and made some things worse – where did all my pictures and documents go?

Computer problem

I know if I keep googling I will find a solution.

Finally came up with the reason for the error message:  ABBYY FineReader 9.0 Sprint.

It came with the Epson software and this is a common problem. There is a solution:  http://knowledgebase.abbyy.com/article/1950, It will have to wait until I finish citations and have some time to experiment.

I lost a day to a software glitch but hope to catch up tomorrow. Then on to scanning photographs.

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For the past month I’ve been reviewing citations – correcting them and making sure they are consistent.

Researching in the 1970s

As I reviewed the citations for passenger manifests I realized how much had changed since I started researching 40 years ago.

NancyShanley

Annie Shanley

Today it takes a few seconds to find my grandmother, Annie Shanley, on a passenger manifest in Ancestry.

Annie Ancestry index

Before the internet it was more complicated.

I was lucky, I had a reliable family story. My grandmother told her children about her trip and my mother told me. Grandma arrived in New York on the day McKinley was shot, or maybe the day he died. When she got off the ferry in Battery Park with her mother the bands were playing. She thought they were to welcome the immigrants, but they were playing for the President.

President McKinley was shot in Buffalo on September 6, 1901 and died on September 14, 1901.

Passenger manifests had been microfilmed by the National Archives Records Administration (NARA). Some were indexed, some were not. Today all the New York records have been grouped by Ancestry into one index: “New York, Passenger Lists, 1820 – 1957.”

Fortunately, the records for 1901 were indexed. I would need to order the correct microfilm roll from the Family History Library or through my local library. After finding the ship and the date I would then need to order another film. This could take weeks.

There was another way, request NARA check the records; for a small fee they would copy the record.
Scan_20170709

I did that, putting the date McKinley was shot, September 6, 1901, and sent the form to NARA in June 1977. I got the results fast –  they couldn’t find it!! How was this possible?
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In September 1978 my cousin Pat decided to order the index from Family Search; she found two Ann Shanley’s but

I have 20-20 vision, borrowed a magnifying glass, had four people there trying to decipher the 2 cards (2 x 3 each)…NO WAY could any of us come up with anything.

A trip to Washington D.C.

It would take a trip to NARA in Washington D.C. in  June of 1981 to find Grandma on a ship’s manifest.

The original index had been done on 2 x 3  cards, one for each passenger with information on name, age, former residence, ship, date of arrival, and a few other details. These cards had been microfilmed and the section I needed had been damaged, the names were gone, but a few bits of information peeked through. Two important pieces of information survived: former residence and ship information. I slowly went through that roll of microfilm and was rewarded with “ROSS” – former residence and the date of arrival.

Next I had to pull Microfilm roll # 222 for September 11, 1901. I didn’t have to look long. There she was: Annie Shanley, age 19, arriving on the S.S. Oceanic with $4.00, meeting her mother who had paid for her ticket.

I ordered a copy – the old readers at NARA did not have printers – and I still have it. It’s about 18″ x 24″.

oceanic passenger list

SS OCeanic

Grandma was in steerage, she called it “the hole of the ship.”

Flash forward to the internet age and I was able to find out more about Grandma’s arrival. The bands were playing to celebrate the expected recovery of the President. A few days later sepsis set in and he died on September 14.

The Oceanic was a big ship and I found several articles about her and about my grandmother’s trip.

Immigration and Naturalization Slides Family version

Back to citations, working on census records now. About halfway through citations, started gathering photographs, maps, illustrations.

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These updates are to ensure I stay on track and work towards my goal – book in hand by May 8, 2018.

The draft is done and now comes the fun part – deciding what pictures, maps, illustrations, and charts to include. At least I thought it would be fun.

This project has taken so long that I have switched computers three times. This last time I thought would be less confusing since I had a plan. Plans don’t always work out and files are here, there, and everywhere.

I thought I lost the photographs of my grandmother’s court case (see Mary is Sued), but after a long search I found them – under Desktop, not This PC or One Drive or OS (C:). I found a lot of the other genealogy photos there too, but not all.

Task List - Book blog

 

Pictures Book slide blog

 

 

I’m also going to review all my citations to make sure they are consistent. It should be a fun summer, my goal is to have this finished by September.

 

 

Task List - Book

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Countdown

May 8, 1918 – Elizabeth (Babsie) Whelan was born

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Babsie – about 18 months old

May 8, 2018 – The Colbert Whelan Family History book will be finished. It will be a hardcover book, with photographs, maps, and illustrations, and will tell the story of the Colbert and Whelan families. 

book advertisement

Babs 006

Babs Whelan and Larry Colbert

Stay tuned for more information.

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Family History Writing Challenge photo FHWC14-290p_zpse0310b87.jpg

I’m taking the challenge again this year – 3rd time. For the month of February I will work on the Colbert Whelan Family History book.

I know, I know, I’ve been working on this for 7 years!! I have a complete draft, but it needs work – a lot of work. I’ve edited and revised much of the Colbert section, so for this challenge month, I will edit and revise the Whelan section. The story will start in Bansha, County Tipperary, with my grandfather’s parents, James Whelan and Honora Keating.

The real challenge will be to complete each chapter – that means I must finish the index and citations too. I will post my progress from time to time, but let’s hope that the end of the month one chapter is compete. Then I will have to set up a plan to complete the rest of the book.

 

These pictures were taken in 1973 by my mother. She and Aunt Angela went to Ireland and visited Bansha and Ross.

Bansha - 1973

Bansha – 1973

Bansha Roman Catholic Church - Whelans were baptized here.
Bansha Roman Catholic Church – Whelans were baptized here.

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I recently searched land records in not one, but two counties: New York and Dutchess.

New York – 66 John Street

I went back to 66 John Street to get more information about the lot that Mary Coleman Colbert leased. She was quite the fighter. She did not give up on her right to the 15 year lease she had obtained in 1865. The plaintiff, Cornelia Austin, did not give up either and kept appealing decisions that did not go her way. The property was finally sold at auction in late 1877, with Mary’s case still open. The other tenants were apparently paid costs out of the sale. I don’t know what happened with Mary’s costs, but she seems to have been able to stay until the end.

The property where Mary Colbert lived was sold at auction in late 1877.

Her grandson, John Grossman, first child of Mary Colbert and George Grossman, was born in his Grandmother’s house  in September 1879.  Mary’s lease ended on April 1, 1880. A few months later, in June 1880, the family is living in Bronxville, Westchester County.

When they returned to the city they lived at 421 East 12oth Street. Not only was this right in back of their old place, it was the lot that had been leased by Charles Spear, one of the other tenants named in the lawsuit! Curious. Spear gave a description of his house in his testimony, so I’m going back to the Old Records Room to check  it out.

I was also able to find that Mary Coleman Colbert’s brother owned a house in Manhattan, also on East 121st Street, but  several blocks west. He bought it in 1885, but didn’t move there until 1900. Maybe he rented it out?

Lawrene Coleman and his wife Julia bought this house in 1885.

Dutchess – 22 Market Street, Poughkeepsie

In New York you usually look up the block and lot number – after all, New York is divided into a grid. In the Dutchess County Clerk Records Room you search using the grantor/grantee books and look for the name. I found what I was looking for quickly and then went straight to the liber to see the deeds. These libers are heavy, and I believe the ones on the bottom row are heavier!

I have to admit  the typed deeds are much easier to read, but it was interesting to read the handwritten property description in one deed. The property was transferred in 1835 in Amenia and was a farm. The description went on and on – a very long page with very small handwriting. Here’s how it starts:

…end of a stonewall  North of the road and north west of the house of Noah Brown thence south eighty three and one half east twelve chains and nine links to stake and stones thence north ten and one half and five chains and fifty links to stake in the wll thence south…

I gave up at that point.

I looked at another deed (typed). This one was from 1926 for property in the City of Beacon and had an interesting clause. I think it may have been carried over from a previous deed. What do you think?

…Occupants and servants at all times to freely pass and re-pass on foot, or with horses, cattle, beasts of burden, wagons, carts, sleighs, carriages, or other vehicles whatsoever to and fro, over said right of way as above bounded and described..

This did  have cars by 1926 and the horses and sleighs were almost a thing of the past. And just how long did people keep cattle in Beacon?

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Yesterday was day 29 of the Family History Writing Challenge. It’s officially over.

Not really.

I plan to continue writing, but now I have some better ideas on how to write, and re-write this Family History book of mine.

I was bogged down in the research, which is the part of genealogy because you never know what you might find.

I know can research and still continue to write. After I do some research, whether it’s at the archives, or in a book, or online, I will write it up and weave it into the story.

Today I worked on some of the Whelan story. I had forgotten how many good stories Aunt Angela told me.

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