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The review of the citations in the book had been going well – until today.

I took a short vacation to attend my niece’s wedding in Indiana.

IMG_6746
Of course when in Indiana I had to take a side trip to the genealogical library in Fort Wayne. Didn’t have time to do any research, but my sister and I did check out family history books to see what we liked.

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Allen County Genealogical Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana

Back home and back to work.

Colbert section – done

Whelan section – done

Section III – almost done – one more day should do it.

Opened up the document and:

>Ms Word has stopped working

I spent all day trying to find a solution. The only change I had made since last using Ms Word was to download the software that came with my new Epson scanner.

Uninstalled it – no change.

I let Windows upload all those updates I had been avoiding – no change and made some things worse – where did all my pictures and documents go?

Computer problem

I know if I keep googling I will find a solution.

Finally came up with the reason for the error message:  ABBYY FineReader 9.0 Sprint.

It came with the Epson software and this is a common problem. There is a solution:  http://knowledgebase.abbyy.com/article/1950, It will have to wait until I finish citations and have some time to experiment.

I lost a day to a software glitch but hope to catch up tomorrow. Then on to scanning photographs.

For the past month I’ve been reviewing citations – correcting them and making sure they are consistent.

Researching in the 1970s

As I reviewed the citations for passenger manifests I realized how much had changed since I started researching 40 years ago.

NancyShanley

Annie Shanley

Today it takes a few seconds to find my grandmother, Annie Shanley, on a passenger manifest in Ancestry.

Annie Ancestry index

Before the internet it was more complicated.

I was lucky, I had a reliable family story. My grandmother told her children about her trip and my mother told me. Grandma arrived in New York on the day McKinley was shot, or maybe the day he died. When she got off the ferry in Battery Park with her mother the bands were playing. She thought they were to welcome the immigrants, but they were playing for the President.

President McKinley was shot in Buffalo on September 6, 1901 and died on September 14, 1901.

Passenger manifests had been microfilmed by the National Archives Records Administration (NARA). Some were indexed, some were not. Today all the New York records have been grouped by Ancestry into one index: “New York, Passenger Lists, 1820 – 1957.”

Fortunately, the records for 1901 were indexed. I would need to order the correct microfilm roll from the Family History Library or through my local library. After finding the ship and the date I would then need to order another film. This could take weeks.

There was another way, request NARA check the records; for a small fee they would copy the record.
Scan_20170709

I did that, putting the date McKinley was shot, September 6, 1901, and sent the form to NARA in June 1977. I got the results fast –  they couldn’t find it!! How was this possible?
Scan_20170709 (2)

In September 1978 my cousin Pat decided to order the index from Family Search; she found two Ann Shanley’s but

I have 20-20 vision, borrowed a magnifying glass, had four people there trying to decipher the 2 cards (2 x 3 each)…NO WAY could any of us come up with anything.

A trip to Washington D.C.

It would take a trip to NARA in Washington D.C. in  June of 1981 to find Grandma on a ship’s manifest.

The original index had been done on 2 x 3  cards, one for each passenger with information on name, age, former residence, ship, date of arrival, and a few other details. These cards had been microfilmed and the section I needed had been damaged, the names were gone, but a few bits of information peeked through. Two important pieces of information survived: former residence and ship information. I slowly went through that roll of microfilm and was rewarded with “ROSS” – former residence and the date of arrival.

Next I had to pull Microfilm roll # 222 for September 11, 1901. I didn’t have to look long. There she was: Annie Shanley, age 19, arriving on the S.S. Oceanic with $4.00, meeting her mother who had paid for her ticket.

I ordered a copy – the old readers at NARA did not have printers – and I still have it. It’s about 18″ x 24″.

oceanic passenger list

SS OCeanic

Grandma was in steerage, she called it “the hole of the ship.”

Flash forward to the internet age and I was able to find out more about Grandma’s arrival. The bands were playing to celebrate the expected recovery of the President. A few days later sepsis set in and he died on September 14.

The Oceanic was a big ship and I found several articles about her and about my grandmother’s trip.

Immigration and Naturalization Slides Family version

Back to citations, working on census records now. About halfway through citations, started gathering photographs, maps, illustrations.

In 1980, shortly after her 90th birthday, Anne Getty stayed at my mother’s house for the weekend. I took the opportunity to tape her reciting a few stories:

Kelly, Burke, and Shea – a poem about Irish American newspapermen reporting on the sinking of the U.S.S. Maine in 1898.
She also recited a poem about Brian Boru and talked about Ross and the quarries.

Anne Getty

These updates are to ensure I stay on track and work towards my goal – book in hand by May 8, 2018.

The draft is done and now comes the fun part – deciding what pictures, maps, illustrations, and charts to include. At least I thought it would be fun.

This project has taken so long that I have switched computers three times. This last time I thought would be less confusing since I had a plan. Plans don’t always work out and files are here, there, and everywhere.

I thought I lost the photographs of my grandmother’s court case (see Mary is Sued), but after a long search I found them – under Desktop, not This PC or One Drive or OS (C:). I found a lot of the other genealogy photos there too, but not all.

Task List - Book blog

 

Pictures Book slide blog

 

 

I’m also going to review all my citations to make sure they are consistent. It should be a fun summer, my goal is to have this finished by September.

 

 

Task List - Book

Countdown

May 8, 1918 – Elizabeth (Babsie) Whelan was born

Babs 001

Babsie – about 18 months old

May 8, 2018 – The Colbert Whelan Family History book will be finished. It will be a hardcover book, with photographs, maps, and illustrations, and will tell the story of the Colbert and Whelan families. 

book advertisement

Babs 006

Babs Whelan and Larry Colbert

Stay tuned for more information.

Every county had a Petty Sessions District – the closest ones to the Aherns were in Oldcastle, County Meath and Mount Nugent, County Cavan. Justices of the Peace heard the various complaints in these courtes which covered criminal charges as well as complaints between neighbors. The clerk recorded the information in books which have survived and make for very interesting reading.

Irish Petty Sessions

Irish Petty Sessions

In Oldcastle court was held on Mondays and the Aherns were often there – they brought charges against their neighbors – for trespassing, allowing their animals to wander and destroy the Ahern crops, assault and the ever populer “abusive and threatening language”. Charges were also brought against them – for the same reasons. They evicted their tenants, tried to get apprentices to continue working and fought with one another. Great great Aunt Kitty seems to have had a thing about breaking windows and her husband, William Knight, did not get along with his mother in law – Bridget Gibbons Ahern. He “threatened to take her life” more than once, and in 1876 spent a few days in jail. He was sent to jail on the first of November  for 20 days, but before he went got drunk in Oldcastle.  After his release from prison he was fined for that offense.

Court in Mount Nugent was held on Thursdays and the Aherns were represented there too, although not as frequently as at Oldcastle.

 

John and James Ahern, along with several other men from Ross were involved in a riot.

– John and James Ahern, along with several other men from Ross were involved in a riot. – 1875 a

James Somerville accused John Ahern of threatening to run a turf slane through his body.

James Somerville accused John Ahern of threatening to run a turf slane through his body.

An example of a turf slane and a man using one to cut turf.

An example of a turf slane and a man using one to cut turf.

Map of Ross showing where James Somerville and John Ahern lived. The turberry was held in common by all the families in Ross.

Map of Ross showing where James Somerville and John Ahern lived. The turberry was held in common by all the families in Ross.

 

John and his son, John got into a few disputes.

John and his son, John got into a few disputes.

These records can be found on Find My Past wh.ich has many Irish records

The Aherns and their dogs.

George Ahern and one of his brothers with the family greyhound.

George Ahern (on right) and one of his brothers with the family greyhound. Probably early 1900s

Dogs were popular in Ireland and they roamed free.  Complaints about them were frequent – they attacked and even killed the livestock and people lived in fear of being bitten by a rabid dog. No one knew who the owners of the dogs were so, in 1865, Parliament passed a law requiring the Irish to register their dogs –

By March 31st of every year the owners had to go to the local petty sessions court to register their dogs. For the Aherns that would have been in Oldcastle. In 1866, the first year of the law, John Ahern went to Oldcastle in February to register his black mastiff. Within a few years, most people were waiting until March to register the dogs. The real rush came the last few days with several hundred people lining up to make the deadline.

In 1866, my great great grandfather was one of the first to register a dog, a black mastiff. In future years, most people waited until the end of March to register their dogs.

In 1866, my great great grandfather, John  Ahearn, was one of the first to register a dog, a black mastiff. In future years, most people waited until the end of March to register their dogs.

John Ahern registered a black mastiff.

John Ahern registered a black mastiff.

My great grandmother, Margaret Shanley had a collie in 1912.

My great grandmother, Margaret Shanley had a collie in 1912.

In this 1920s picture she's holding a cat, but Margaret Shanley owned a collie for a few years.

In this 1920s picture she’s holding a cat, but Margaret Shanley owned a collie for a few years.

Look closely and you'll see the dog standing in front of the house (Quarry House in Ross)

Look closely and you’ll see the dog standing in front of the house (Quarry House in Ross)

Stamp that was affixed to the dog license. Different colors were used throughout the years.

Stamp that was affixed to the dog license. Different colors were used throughout the years.

This would have been given to the owner of the dog.

This would have been given to the owner of the dog.

Patrick Whelan, who may have been my grandfather's uncle was fined because his dog was unlicensed. Note Anne Whelan who was fined for letting two asses run free. She may have been my grandmother.

Patrick Whelan, who may have been my grandfather’s uncle, was fined because his dog was unlicensed. Note Anne Whelan who was fined for letting two asses run free. She may have been my great grandmother.

If you didn’t register the dog you were subject to fines.

The copy of the “Bill for regulating Keeping of Dogs and for Protection of Sheep and other Property from Dogs in Ireland” comes from http://eppi.dippam.ac.uk/documents/14740; Sessional Papers 569, Volume 1, Session 1865